Scientific Program

Day 1 :

  • Keynote Speaker

Session Introduction

Akuma Saningong

Master communicator and expert in unlocking and maximizing your potential by Bridging Science and Personal Development.

Title: The New Biology of Epigenetics
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Akuma Saningong is a master communicator and expert in unlocking and maximizing your potential by Bridging Science and Personal Development. He done his PhD in Natural Sciences with emphasis on Biotechnology and Protein Biochemistry .Former University Lecturer in Molecular Biology and Polymer Chemistry ,Former Head of R&D in the Sustainable Use of Bio-Wastes to produce Biobased Products ,Former Director of three International Research and Innovation Networks with key players from Academia and Industry . His research area of Interest are Protein Biochemistry , Molecular Biology , Biotechnology and Polymer Chemistry 

Abstract:

The science of epigenetics, which literally means „control above genetics“, profoundly changes our understanding of how life is controled. Environmental influences including nutrition, stress, and emotions, can modify genes without changing their basic blueprint. The environment serves as a „contractor“ who reads and engages those genetic blueprints and is ultimately responsible for the character of a cells’s life. It is a single cell’s „awareness“ of the environment that primaruly sets into motion the mechanisms of life.

In fact epigenetics, the study of the molecular mechanisms by which the environment controls gene activity, is today one of the most active areas of scientific reserach. Epigentics reveals that when we change our perceptions and environment, our genes can change as well.  The idea that our perceptions override our genes is now at the forefront of medical research. Everything we've left out of the medical model - energy, thoughts, spirit - now turns out to be the primary mechanism of interaction with physical reality.

Speaker
Biography:

Jose Antonio Cruz , CEO of Kuragobiotek -Mexico.

Abstract:

There is no greatest marvelous in the universe than life in balance, since the big bang to actual time, the most refined and sophisticated energy to matter, matter to energy convertor is life in balance. When life, is in balance has 3 main characteristics; is high efficient, sustainable and because such levels of performance, all what life in balance produce are beautiful.

The human body has balance metabolically when their 3 biomas be in homeostasis; Genome, Microbiome and Epigenome. Each one of them interact with the others to get perfect full organic balance, when this homeostasis is reach, human can live 120 years plenty in cognitive and psychomotor conditions.

Human cells have a natural tendency to keep balance, will try to compensate any un balance at microbiome and epigenome, describing in this behavior some kind of cellular hysteresis.

To keep life in balance at human body, is necessary to interact with external environment to get air to breathe, food to feed, water to hydrated and sun to synthetize some vitamins and nutriments, the connection between internal biomas and external biomas in nature is our brain, the concept of two brains, the regular one and our intestine as second one could be evolve considering just one brain that is deploy in our body since regular brain, get down by nervous system, interconnect with peripheric nervous system and with enteral nervous system, in all of this interconnections epigenetic is present, then this just one brain is deploy in our digestive system that allow the interaction whit the microbiome, with this interact as well with our food that come from external bioma, because looks like life in balance some way is all connected.

Prof. Laila Montaser

Menoufia University, Egypt

Title: Hepatic tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

Time : 11:40-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Laila Montaser, is Head of Stem Cell, Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering, & Nanotechnology (SRTN) Group, Professor of Clinical Pathology at the School of Medicine in Shebin El-Kom, Menoufia, Egypt. She also serves as the Head, Founder of Clinical Pathology Department, School of Medicine, Menoufia University, Egypt. She received her undergraduate degree at School of Medicine, Alexandria University, Egypt, and her M.Sc. & MD degrees at School of Medicine, Tanta University. She is President, Chief Scientist, founder of Stem Cell, Regenerative Medicine, Tissue Engineering & Nanotechnology (SRTN) Group (Inaugural holder of the SRTN Chair). She is the nominator of Council of Menoufia University to TWAS prize in Medical Sciences and nominator of Menoufia Faculty of Medicine to Award of Nano Science Research Excellence. She is a member of several international & national societies. She appointed as an editorial board member/peer reviewer of many International Journals.

Abstract:

Tissue engineering proves to be a precarious therapy for hepatic failure patients. In spite of the massive obstacles offered by the intricacy of the liver’s structure and function, improvements in liver physiology, stem cell biology and reprogramming, and the engineering of tissues and machines are speeding the evolution of stem cell-based therapies for curing liver diseases. The expression “hepatic tissue engineering” briefs one of the maximum targets of novel biotechnology: the potential of proliferation the functions of the liver for the sake to cure liver failures and, ultimately, may originate a well workable organ to be implanted or used as an apparatus situated outside the body. For effective tissue regeneration, the cells constituting the tissues to be regenerated are needed. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are hopeful nominees for cell therapy and tissue engineering. A great complication experienced with stem cell therapies has been the failure of injected cells to imbed to objective tissues. The application of nanotechnology to stem cell biology would be able to finesse those defies. These combinations allow nanotechnology to engineer scaffolds with various countenances to control stem cell destiny resolutions. Fabrication of Nano-fibrous scaffolds onto which stem cells can adhere and spread, forming a niche-like microenvironment which can drive stem cells to go ahead to repair injured tissues. In this manuscript, existing and emergent tactic based on stem cells in the domain of liver tissue engineering is offered for precise implementation. The combination of stem cells and tissue engineering launches novel standpoints in tissue regeneration for stem cell therapy because of the probable to monitor stem cell attitude with the features of the engineered scaffold milieu. Presently, hepatogenic differentiation of stem cells has produced confidence and troth for use of these cells in hepatic tissue engineering.

 

Speaker
Biography:

CEO and Founder of Biotechnology and Regenerative Medicine at RegenerAge International ™ (www.regenerage.clinic). Vice President of International Clinical Development for Bioquark, Inc. (www.bioquark.com) and Chief Clinical Officer at ReAnima™ Advanced Biosciences (www.reanima.tech). Advance Fellow by the American Board of Anti-Aging and Regenerative Medicine (A4M), Visiting Scholar at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Dermatology). Fellow in Stem Cell Medicine by the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine and University of South Florida.

Abstract:

As it has been previously demonstrated that coelectroporation of Xenopus laevis frog oocytes with normal cells and cancerous cell lines induces the expression of pluripotency markers and in experimental murine model studies that mRNA extract (Bioquantine®) purified from intra and extra-oocyte liquid phases of electroporated oocytes) showed potential as a treatment for a wide range of conditions, including Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) among others. The current study observed beneficial changes with Bioquantine® administration in a patient with a severe SCI. Pluripotent stem cells have therapeutic and regenerative potential in clinical situations CNS disorders even cancer. One method of reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells is to expose them to extracts prepared from Xenopus laevis oocytes. The positive human findings for spinal cord injury with the results from previous animal studies with experimental models of traumatic brain injury and SCI respectively as our evidence and due to ethical reasons, legal restrictions and a limited number of patients, we were able to treat only a very small number of patients, deciding to include in our protocol the RestoreSensor SureScan to complete it. Based on the electrical stimulation for rehabilitation and regeneration after spinal cord injury published by Hamid and MacEwan, we designed an improved delivery method for the in-situ application of MSCs and Bioquantine® in combination with the RestoreSensor® SureScan®. To the present day the patient who suffered a complete section of spinal cord at T12-L1 shows an improvement in sensitivity, strength in striated muscle and smooth muscle connection, 13 months after the first treatment and 6 months after the placement of RestoreSensor® at the level of the lesion, showing an evident improvement on his therapy of physical rehabilitation (legs movement) on crawling forward and backwards and standing on his feet for the first time and showing a progressively important functionality on both limbs.

  • Medical Biotechnology and Biomedical Engineering|Plant Biotechnology |Agricultural and Environmental Biotechnology

Session Introduction

Mohsen Hajheidari

Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research , Germany

Title: REDUCED COMPLEXITY, RCO: a leaf sculptor within the Brassicaceae family
Speaker
Biography:

Mohsen Hajheidari obtained his master’s degree in Plant Breeding at the University of Razi, Iran. Before undertaking his Ph.D in the group of Csaba Koncz in the Department of Plant Developmental Biology at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ), he was a scientific member at the Agricultural Biotechnology Research Institute of Iran. He completed his Ph.D. in Genetics in 2010 at the University of Cologne as an International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) student. Following a postdoctoral study in the group of Csaba Koncz, he joined the group of Miltos Tsiantis in the Department of Comparative Development and Genetics in 2013. He is currently using comparative genetic approaches to uncover the genetic bases of leaf morphological complexity in plants. His goal is to combine evolutionary and computational approaches with comparative genetics and molecular physiology to further decipher plant-environment interaction.   

Abstract:

We are currently experiencing unprecedented climate change, which is a serious threat to our natural resources and food security at a time of rapid population increase. The sustainable food security requires a constant increase of genetic potential in crops. In order to increase the genetic potential of crops, exploring the genetic resources beyond major crops is a necessity. Leaf size and shape have an important effect on physiological processes such as photosynthesis and transpiration and thus on plant biomass. Therefore how morphological diversity of plant leaves is regulated constitutes an important branch of plant biology. In order to understand the genetic basis of morphological diversity in leaves, we have introduced a new model system C. hirsuta, which has dissected leaves with distinct leaflets, and it is a close relative of A. thaliana, which has simple leaves. Using comparative genetic approaches we discovered that a tandem duplication of the LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY 1 (LMI1) gene has given rise to two new copies in C. hirsuta. Diversification of the regulatory elements and coding sequence in one of the copies led to emergence of a novel transcription factor called Reduced Complexity, RCO. The RCO gene was lost in A. thaliana, contributing to leaf simplification in this species. In contrast to LMI1, which is expressed in the margins of leaflets, RCO is expressed at the base of leaflets and promotes leaflet formation through local growth regulation. RCO expression is limited to leaves and its function is independent of shoot apical meristem development. Our data demonstrated that RCO is capable of improving photosynthetic efficiency, suggesting its contribution to adaptive evolution of leaf morphology. RCO studies could provide a basis for improvement of photosynthetic efficiency in crops

Olga Onyshchenko

Anti-age dentist, aesthetic injectionist, specialist in tissue regeneration BTI Biotechnology Institute , Ukraine

Title: Biological effects of plasma rich in growth factors in tissue regeneration. Benefits and easy use of biotechnologies in the daily practice of health practitioners.
Speaker
Biography:

Anti-age dentist, aesthetic injectionist, specialist in tissue regeneration .

Abstract:

Based on the expertise in anti-age dentistry and working with the biotechnology of the largest scientific background in regenerative medicine, which is plasma rich in growth factors, in the lecture will be presented the range of properties of this biological therapy for individualized medicine. It was proven to be effective in regeneration of tissues differentiated from the mesenchymal stem cells (cells composing muscular-skeletal system, like osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes as well as myocytes and neurons), the capacity of which ones to proliferate and differentiate is known to decrease with the age of the patient. The lecture will present the data of scientific studies of different levels to prove the regenerative potential of patient’s own blood proteins (growth factors) to perform the safe and high-quality treatment in different areas of medicine while reducing the possibilities of side effects and performing less- or non-invasive procedures to our patients. Additionally will be presented the set of clinical cases illustrating the theoretical part of the lecture and how easy it is to introduce such biotechnologies into the daily practice of the professionals in dental, surgical, dermatological, traumatological, ophthalmological spheres, as well as sports medicine and focusing on own clinical results in esthetic and anti-age medicine.

Débora Colombi

Scientific Director of Genotyping, Brazil

Title: Nanoparticles based bacterial identification kit
Speaker
Biography:

Débora Colombi is a Brazilian entrepreneur who founded two companies: Genotyping and BPI. She has degree in Biomedicine from UNIFESP and a Masters’ and PhD degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology from USP and a post doctorate in Genetics from UNESP. The objective of her actual project is the development of a kit for the detection of bacterial contaminants present in the fermentation tanks of sugarcane industries. The company is already expanding the kit to other markets to facilitate the identification of contaminants in loco. Her companies offer genomic solutions for researchers and other companies, in addition to human genetic diagnoses.

 

Abstract:

Brazil is the second largest ethanol producer in the world, using yeast fermentation by sugar cane, Brazil produces 26 billion liters per year, which means a market of 20 billion dollars. Bacterial contamination is a relevant factor in the industrial process, as this can cause damage to the transformation of raw material fermentation in other undesirable substances or consuming part of ethanol, which leads to losses in fermentation yield, causing financial loss.Methods   used   today    to    measure   bacterial    contamination    aremicroscopic counting, plating techniques and MC kit. The problemsof these methods are very high response time (one to five days), and the lack of bacteria identification due to measure of sub-products. Our solution aims at the production of a kit for rapid monitoring andidentification      of      contaminant       microorganisms      based on immunosensor   colorimetric    change.   Biosensors   based   on   gold nanoparticles  can  be  bio  conjugated  with  various  ligands  such  as nucleic acids and antibodies. After the bio conjugation, they start forming aggregates, which shifts the absorption band to ca. 600–800 nm. This change can be observed by the naked eye or measured quantitatively with an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer Measure will be carried out in half an hour, in this way alcohol industry  will  be  able  to  have  more  timely  interventions  to  stop contamination and use less antibiotics in controlling contaminants.Our experiment indicates that bacteria can be detected quickly and accurately without any amplification or enrichment in around 100 cfu/mL level with excellent discrimination against any other bacteria. In this work we have demonstrated a universal method for detectionbacteria using gold nanoparticles. This proves to be a quick, simpleand clean way to detect bacteria in real time.

Speaker
Biography:

Luis Lightbourn, president of the Instituto de Investigación Lightbourn located at Mexico, he is an expert in plant biotechnology, genomics, cell biology and has over 30 years of experience in plant biochemistry and molecular biology. Throughout his research career he has focused on how light regulates plant growth and development. In particular, he has made a major contribution to understanding the molecular responses of plants to ultraviolet radiation. Doctor Lightbourn has a range of expertise that has attracted invitations to contribute to a wide range of activities, including assessment of research strategy, industry consultation and government advice.

Abstract:

 Exposure to high-intensity UV-B irradiation induces the expression of many genes normally involved in defense, wounding, or general stress responses. However detailed processes of the linkage between light UV-B signaling and the upregulation of gene expression remain unclear. Therefore, the mechanism by which UV-B stress triggers the intracellular defense signaling pathway remains poorly understood. Moreover, according to our knowledge, no studies have analyzed the overall changes in global gene expression in bell pepper leaves exposed to UV-B. Molecular biological analyses have allowed us to draw a picture of UV stress responses in plants, and determination of the transcriptome has had a significant impact on this research field. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Therefore, deep sequencing, transcriptome assembly, and differential expression analysis were performed to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of Capsicum annuum in response to UV-B exposure. A global transcriptome analysis of the response to high-intensity UV-B irradiation was conducted and target genes regulated by UV-B were identified. Findings: We conducted a high-throughput screening analysis. After 1 h, 273 genes showed significantly different expression between control and treated plants, among these 111 were up-regulated and 162 were down-regulated; these were involved in several putative metabolic pathways related to biotic stress. After gene annotation and gene ontology enrichment analysis it was possible to determine that the UV-B radiation induced the expression of genes with functions in UV protection, including antioxidant enzymes, G proteins, primary and secondary metabolism, and transcription factors (Figure 1). Conclusion & Significance: Transcriptome profiling highlights possible signaling pathways and molecules for future research. These results opened ways of exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of UV-B irradiation on Capsicum and have great implications for further studies.

 

  • Young Research forum
Speaker
Biography:

Ana Peigneux has expertise in molecular biology focused on protein purification for biotechnological applications. During her Master’s thesis she was working with phage endolysins as a promising alternative to antibiotics for treatment of resistant bacterial infections. Currently, she is doing the PhD under the supervision of Dr Jimenez Lopez in the University of Granada, Spain. The main goal of her thesis is the study and the purification of magnetosome-associated proteins to synthesize magnetosome-like nanoparticles with improved magnetic properties. Moreover, she got two grants to do an internship in Dr Prat lab (Italy), where she applied these biomimetic magnetite nanoparticles as carriers for drug delivery. The present work show the promising results obtained of these smart nanocarriers for a targeted chemotherapy and immunotherapy. This approach was recently filed in a patent (P201731358).

Abstract:

Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) find many applications, including biotechnology, as they can be manipulated by an external magnetic field and functionalized with different molecules. Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize magnetosomes (membrane-enveloped magnetites), which are the ideal magnetic particle. However, scaling-up magnetosome production is still challenging, so biomimetics, i.e. in vitro magnetite synthesis mediated by magnetosome-associated proteins is being explored. Our group is working with MamC from Magnetococcus marinus MC-1 that controls the morphology and size of the crystals, producing well faceted biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles (BMNPs) of ~ 40 nm, which are paramagnetic at room and body temperature while having a large magnetic moment per particle under an external magnetic field. These BMNPs were cytocompatible and biocompatible in vivo. BMNPs were functionalized (isothermal adsorption) with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) recognizing the ectodomain of the human Met/HGF receptor (overexpressed in many cancers) and the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin (DOXO). The functionalized BMNPs present hyperthermia and were stable at physiological pH, while releasing the adsorbed DOXO at acidic pH. mAb functionalization of BMNPs favoured their interaction with cells expressing the Met/HGFR, and cellular DOXO uptake and toxicity, which was enhanced upon cell exposition to a continuous magnetic field. Real-time cytotoxicity of the BMNPs showed that DOXO-mAb-BMNPs were significantly more toxic than DOXO-BMNPs on Met/HGFR expressing cells, while no differential toxicity was observed on cells not expressing this receptor. When DOXO-BMNPs were injected intravenously in tumor bearing mice and an external magnetic field was applied there, a higher amount of BMNPs accumulated in the tumor and tumor growth was decreased in comparison to mice in which no magnetic field was applied. These BMNPs could thus represent effective nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery, and might be combined with hyperthermia to increase efficiency, resulting in a targeted local treatment of tumors with a decrease in the deleterious systemic side effects.

Mohammad Numan Ibne Asad

Department of Isotope Biogeochemistry, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-, Germany

Title: Characterization of anaerobic biotransformation of β-hexachlorocyclohexaneMohammad
Speaker
Biography:

Mohammad Numan have recently completed his MS from JLU Giessen on Biotechnology. Especially  MS expertise focused in applied microbiology, biotransformation, microbial ecology, and bioengineering.Biotechnology. Applied microbiology, Microbial ecology, metagenomics, functional genomics, proteomics, recombinant technology, Isotope geochemistry etc.

 

Abstract:

Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) is a contaminant of concern worldwide. HCH has four main isomers α, β, δ, and γ-HCH. Since only γ-HCH (Lindane) has a specific pesticide activity, the purification of Lindane resulted in the production of other waste residues. β-HCH is the most persistent one, has relatively low water solubility and is considered highly carcinogenic and health hazardous. A large amount of β-HCH produced as a by-product which was dumped at landfill sites has caused heavy contamination in soil, groundwater, and atmosphere. In this study, we focused on the anaerobic degradation of β-HCH. Thus far, only one anaerobic, Dehalobacter sp. containing, a culture was reported in the literature. Contaminated soil was collected from a highly contaminated site in China and anaerobic microcosms were set up to enrich β-HCH degrading microorganisms. The degradation potential was evaluated by measuring the concentration of the products benzene and mono chlorobenzene (MCB). At the same time, cell growth was monitored by fluorescent microscopy. Illumina sequencing was done for the first and second generation and bacteria belonging to the Firmicutes, including Dehalobacter, Gelria, and Gracilibacter, were dominant. Additionally, the genomic DNA from an active, fourth generation, the β-HCH degrading culture was isolated and a 16s-rRNA clone library was prepared for subsequent sequencing to analyze the overall microbial diversity. Furthermore, compound-specific carbon stable isotope analysis (CSIA) will be applied to investigate the transformation pathway.

Day 2 :

  • B2B Meetings & Panel Discussions